Incentive Dissonance: statistical corruption and federal grants.

At present, government holds the ultimate monopoly on the provision of policing, protection and defense services.  Despite the appearance of differing levels of government, such as county, state or federal administrations, the result is the same: revenues are expropriated from tax producers, filtered through various bureaucratic entities (with each siphoning off administrative costs) and used to create the appearance of public security services. 

Collecting, collating and presenting statistics in a variety of formats is only one of the ways that government provided services create security fiction.  The beauty of the system is that regardless of the reality for the tax paying public, bureaucrats and politicians get paid the same amount whether they succeed or fail.  Its great to hold a monopoly where pay is not affected by performance.

In most cases, when government security services fail, such as in the wake of the Pearl Harbor and 9/11 attacks, or the current instability on the US and Mexico border,  they can justify larger budgets, greater bureaucracies and expanded authorities.  When these politicians and bureaucrats simply want to maintain their flow of tax revenues, they need only create the perception of providing improved security.  Therein lies the incentive problem; dissonance of interests between security producers and consumers in the current monopoly system.

In this follow up to a previous video, one brave deputy from a Texas Sheriff’s Office on the Mexican border exposes just a few of the ways a politician manipulates statistics, defrauds the tax producer and creates security fiction while servicing only his own needs. 

This is only one example of how the entire public security services operate systemically:

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About The Jade(d) Warrior

Decades of walking the path of the warrior in service to noble ideals leaves one, well...jaded.
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